Publications

Below is a selection of publications authored or co-authored by Dr Deirdre Hughes, OBE:

A full Publications listing can be found here.

Click on the link to access the relevant publication(s).

2015

2014

2013

2012

  • Hughes. D. (2012) The Right Advice at the Right Time, Australian Career Practitioner Journal, Vol 23, (3), Spring 2012, pp.12-13
  • Hughes, D. (2012) Improving Lifelong Career Guidance and ICT Support project: Legislation on Career Guidance in EU member states, EU-funded project on behalf of the Croatian Public Employment Service and Tribal Education Ltd, February 2012
  •  Hughes, D. (2012) Improving  Lifelong Career Guidance and ICT Support project: Analysis and assessment of the statutory provisions underpinning National Guidance Fora in EU Member State, EU-funded project managed by the Croatian Public Employment Service and Tribal Education Ltd, February 2012
  • Hughes, D. (2012) Improving Lifelong Career Guidance and ICT Support project: Quality Assurance Frameworks in an EU context. EU-funded project managed by the Croatian Public Employment Service and Tribal Education Ltd, May 2012.
  • Brown, A., Bimrose, J., Barnes, S-A. and Hughes, D. (2012) The role of career adaptabilities for mid-career changers, Journal Of Vocational Behavior, 80 (3 ), 754 – 761 (0001-8791)
  • Bimrose, J. & Hughes, D. (2012) Research Study on Costs Associated with a Revised Remit and Structure of the Careers Wales Service, Cardiff: Welsh Assembly Government, pp. 1-56. Available from: The Welsh Assembly Government

2011

  • Hughes, D. (2011) A New Era for Careers: choices and consequences. Smith Institute Monograph, London.

http://www.smith-institute.org.uk/file/Women%20in%20SET.pdf

Abstract:

There are proposals for schools in England to have responsibility for providing careers services.  To avoid compounding the paucity of applicants for careers in science, engineering and technology, those providing careers guidance will need to understand the very real opportunities these fields offer students of all abilities. With the wide range of jobs available needing different skills levels, it is a crucial area that we have to get right. See Chapter 5.

Hughes, D. (2011Building the Evidence-base for Careers Work: In search of the Holy Grail? inProfessionalisation of Career Guidance in Europe: Training, Guidance Research, Service Organisation and MobilityDgvt Verlag, Tübingen ISBN 978-3-87159-712-1, 48 Euro.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Professionalisation-Career-Guidance-Europe Organisation/dp/3871597120

Abstract:

The long term skills challenge as outlined by governments nationally and internationally highlight the need for improved access to careers education and guidance for all young people and adults. This boost in profiling careers work raises a significant question: how can we be sure that career education and guidance interventions really make a difference in driving up a nation’s skills-base and ensuring economic growth? The careers profession is faced with responding to this key challenge as government officials prioritise their budgets and outline their policy decisions. This paper draws upon differing, yet complementary, approaches designed to stimulate further investment in building the evidence-base for careers work. It focuses on applied research and evidence-based methodologies currently being adopted the UK. The main proposition focuses primarily on guidance organisations‟ failure, so far, to utilise evidence-based policies and practices to good effect beyond the basic reporting requirements set by government policy-makers.

Bimrose J., Brown, A., Barnes, S.A & Hughes, D. (2011) The Role of Career Adaptability and Skills Supply. London: UK Commission for Employment and Skills

http://www.ukces.org.uk/assets/bispartners/ukces/docs/publications/evidence-report-35-role-of-career-adaptability.pdf

Abstract:

This study, undertaken by the Warwick Institute of Employment Research, explores the concept of career adaptability and builds on existing national and international research as well as complementing previous work by the UK Commission on employability (UKCES, 2009).  The  report improves our understanding of the wide range of goals, aspirations, achievements and identities that shape the way that individuals interact with and move through the labour market. It highlights the dynamic way in which individuals engage with learning and development pathways, sometimes with transformational shifts in perspective as their careers unfold, which can involve periods of up-skilling and reskilling. The research considers  the potential advantages  of  career adaptability: for improving public policy in areas such as the quality and effectiveness of career support services; and for  encouraging greater autonomy and control  by  individuals of their careers.

Bimrose J., Brown, A., Barnes, S.A & Hughes, D. (2011) The Role of Career Adaptability and Skills Supply – Technical Report. London: UK Commission for Employment and Skills

http://www.ukces.org.uk/assets/bispartners/ukces/docs/publications/evidence-report-35-technical-report.pdf

Abstract:

The study has been successful in capturing evidence of career adaptability. As such, it has complemented and extended the on-going international study into the concept of career adaptability, which is a key element in understanding successful labour market transitions and accumulation of skills at the individual level. The psycho-social approach to career adaptability adopted by the international study has been effectively implemented in this study. This approach has offered an exploration of the competencies that need to be developed to increase career adaptability in individuals.

Bimrose, J., Hughes, D. & Barnes, S.A (2011) Integrating new technologies into careers practice: Extending the knowledge base. London: UK Commission for Employment and Skills.

http://www.ukces.org.uk/assets/ukces/docs/publications/integrating-new-technololgies-into-careers-practice.pdf

 Abstract:

A greater integration of new information and communication technologies (ICT) in careers practice on a UK-wide basis is being mediated by changes occurring within public, private and community sectors. This report examines emerging structures for the delivery of services across the public, private and community sectors, together with the impact of ICT integration, especially for workforce development. By so doing, it complements and extends UK Commission for Employment and Skills (the UK Commission) recently published reports that have examined the way in which technology can enhance careers support and the ways that labour market information (LMI) is already used in online. It also builds upon earlier research findings, which examined governments’ role in stimulating, regulating and/or compensating for market failure in careers support services. Through a series of in-depth interviews and consultations with policy-makers, senior executives from industry and commerce, employers and careers practitioners, a complex picture emerges with significant variations and opportunities for integrating ICT more fully into careers policies and practices across the UK.

2010

Hughes, D. (2010) Social Mobility and Careers Service Provision in England. London: Careers England Research Report.

http://www.iccdpp.org/Portals/1/Social%20Mobility%20and%20Careers%20Service%20Provision%20in%20England%20160810%5B1%5D.pdf

Abstract:

The contents of this paper build upon an earlier analysis of social mobility policy and upon key themes emerging from recent interviews with six leading figures from within industry and education. Also, a review of research literature on the impact of careers education, information, advice and guidance (CEIAG) provides a strong evidencebase to help influence and inform the design and implementation of a progressive strategy for a new all-age careers service framework in England. From a combination of these sources, a compelling argument is made for timely, relevant and cost effective public, private and voluntary/community careers service delivery arrangements throughout England.

Edwards, H., Hughes, D., & Saunders, D. (2010) A Review of Careers Service Provision in Wales Cardiff: Welsh Assembly Government. Cardiff: The Welsh Assembly.

http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/publications/researchandevaluation/evaluation/futureambitions/?lang=en

Abstract:

The Report ‘Future Ambitions: developing careers services in Wales’ sets out a vision for the development of careers services in Wales.

Its sixty recommendations cover many aspects of careers-related provision and embrace a wide range of service providers. They offer pointers as to how the relationships between these service providers might be improved in the interests of the service user by building a more flexible, efficient, coherent and effective system of careers provision.

Taken together, these proposals represent a medium term strategy for the next three to five years. They entail some fundamental and progressive changes in approach which we recognise will take some time to put into effect. They aim to provide a direction of travel which can be geared to the practicalities of change management and the realities of resource constraints.

2009

Hughes, D. (2009) UK Country Report: Career Development and Public Policy. Commissioned by DBIS, LSC, DWP, DELNI, Welsh Assembly Government, and Future Skills Scotland. Fifth International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy, Wellington, New Zealand, November 2009.

http://www.iccdpp.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=QBJLJR10%2fQU%3d&tabid=249&mid=816

 Abstract:

By legislation, careers service provision is free to all young people throughout the UK; more generally, this is widely accessible to young people and adults through a variety of sources including schools, colleges, universities, local authorities, careers companies, community-based organisations, employers, and national online and telephone helpline services. There are a number of differences, as well as similarities, in the arrangements for providing careers services across the four constituent  countries of the UK, partly reflecting their geography, culture, and relative population sizes, and also the differences in the constitutional responsibilities that apply to the devolved administrations.

For example, in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland there are publicly-funded all age careers services, accountable to the appropriate devolved administration; whereas in England, the equivalent services are organised and delivered separately for young people and for adults. In England and Wales much of the provision is contracted out to careers companies, mainly non-profit. In addition, the delivery of information, advice and placement services aimed primarily at unemployed adults in England, Scotland and Wales is the responsibility of the Department of Work and Pensions and is managed across the three countries by Jobcentre Plus; in Northern Ireland similar, but separate, arrangements apply.

Hughes, D. & Gration, G. (2009) Evidence and Impact: careers and guidance related intervention: On-line Professional Resource CfBT Education Trust, ReadingRetrieved from:

http://www.eep.ac.uk/DNN2/Portals/0/IAG/E&I(Synthesis)_FINAL(W).pdf

Abstract:

This synthesis report highlights the rationale and methodology which has informed the design and development of the Evidence and Impact: careers and guidance-related interventions online professional resource. The contents provide a brief overview of key issues and challenges involved in measuring and assessing the impact of careers and guidance-related interventions.

Hughes, D. & Gration, G. (2009) A literature review of careers and guidance related interventions, Reading: CfBT Education Trust.

http://www.eep.ac.uk/DNN2/Portals/0/IAG/Literature%20Review.pdf

Abstract:

The extensive body of research evidence that endeavours to show the impact of CEIAG interventions in terms of participation and retention in education, training, employment, and other ‘hard’ outcomes is open to interpretation. As a result, it is difficult to quantify in ‘precise terms’ the impact that these interventions have on young people’s intermediate and longer-term learning, social and/or economic outcomes. However, there is a reasonably strong case to be made that CEIAG interventions can and do make a difference in terms of ‘soft’ outcomes such as increased self-confidence and enhanced decision-making skills that can be seen as precursors or proxy indicators that make a significant contribution to longer term socio-economic outcomes.

Hughes, D. & Gration, G. (2009) Evidence and Impact: careers and guidance related interventions. A Sythnesis Paper, Reading: CfBT Education Trust

http://www.cfbt.com/evidenceforeducation/pdf/3E&I%20Synthesis_FINAL(Web)%20July09.pdf

Abstract:

The aim of this report is to provide an introduction to a new online professional resource designed to make available international and national research evidence on the impact of careers and guidance-related interventions. The contents of this synthesis report offer powerful insights into key facts, impact statements, strategies, tools and tips that can be used as a basis for impact assessment and continuous development for organisations, managers and practitioners operating within a youth policy context.

2008

Bimrose, J., Barnes, S. -A. and Hughes, D.(2008) ‘Adult career progression and advancement: a five year study of the effectiveness of guidance’, 1 – 107, London: Warwick Institute for Employment Research, DfES, [Report to Government]

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2008/eg_report_4_years_on_final.pdf

Abstract:

The complexity of adult career trajectories has been captured by this longitudinal study.  Career trajectories have shifted, reversed, remained static – sometimes transforming themselves beyond recognition, as clients have: progressed in their chosen occupation; changed jobs; moved from unemployment to employment; engaged in a process of up-skilling or re-skilling; and dealt with personal changes in their life.  Data collected over a five year period illustrate how adults move between and within both job roles and occupational sectors.  It also shows movements into and out of education, training and paid employment.

Hughes, D. (2008) The New Adult Advancement Careers Service: What’s in a name? Institute of Career Guidance, Occasional Paper. Stourbridge: Institute of Career Guidance, England.

http://www.icg-uk.org/hres/new%20adult%20advancement%20and%20careers%20service%20in%20england1.pdf

Abstract:

In March 2005, Dr Hughes co-hosted a 24-hour consultation event at Derby  to examine the issue of branding, including a market in career. In this ICG occasional paper it seemed  timely to revisit some of the main outcomes from this, and earlier work by Hughes &Gray, in 2004, to consider how best to inform and influence government policies which grapple with the conundrum of the state’s role and responsibilities for expanding advancement and careers provision within the confines of limited public sector spending.

Hughes, D., Davies, D., Bright, G. and Dyke, S. (2008). NEET SPEAKS: Influences Shaping Young People’s Choices of Education, Training and Employment, South Yorkshire Learning & Skills Council, Sheffield.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/icegs/research-briefs/neet-speaks-influences-shaping-young-peoples-choices-of-education-training-and-employment/key-findings

Abstract:

This research revealed a diversity of experiences, attitudes and behaviours of young people in the NEET group. Drawing on the narratives of the young people’s lives, five key themes began to emerge. During debriefing sessions participants reported that they had found that taking part in the research had been personally fulfilling and had given them a shared sense of experience and validation of their everyday experiences.

2007

Hughes, D. (2007). Maximising the Value of Career Development for Sustainable Growth and Social Equality: England Country Paper. Commissioned by the Department for Innovation and Skills (DIUS), Sheffield: Moorfoot, pp. 1-11.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_maximising_the_value_of_career_development2007.pdf

Abstract:

Closing the gap between the ‘skills rich’ and the ‘skill poor’ is a high priority for government and local/ regional agencies. Compared to other nations, results from the OECD showed that England at that time was ranked 18th for low skills, 20th for intermediate skills and 11th for high skills. The Government’s ‘Leitch Implementation Plan’ (2007)made explicit how best to achieve the optimal skills mix in order to maximise economic growth, productivity and social justice. This emerged from the LeitchReview of Skills (2006) commissioned by the then Chancellor of the Exchequer – Gordon Brown and the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which emphasised the concept of ‘career’, linked to aspiration and progression, with recommendations for a new universal careers service for adults.

Hughes, D. and Morgan, S. (2007). Choices in the 21st Century: Career Support and Guidance. In: Myers, K., Adler, S., Leonard, D. & Taylor, H. (eds) Genderwatch. Stoke on Trent: Trentham Books, pp. 93-97

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. & Watts, A.G. (2007) Youth Policy: Careers Summit Strategy, Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_youth_policycareers_summary2007.pdf

Abstract:

The aim of the Youth Policy: Careers Summit was to identify what the careers community should be seeking to achieve, in association with strategic partners, in order to assure the future of high-quality careers work for young people in England. Participants were reminded that a number of previous ‘Policy Consultation’ events had failed to implement key recommendations; therefore,

the main challenge for this Summit was to agree a common agenda and to follow through with decisive leadership and action.

2006

Bimrose, J., Barnes, S-A. & Hughes, D.(2006) ‘Developing career trajectories in England: the role of effective guidance’, [Report to Government]

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2006/egreportnov06.pdf

               

Abstract:

The purpose of the research is to evaluate the effectiveness of guidance by tracking the

career trajectories of research participants and establish the role that guidance has

played in this process.  Fifty in-depth case studies were initially completed (December,

2003 to March, 2004).  Analyses of these data are presented in the first report.  All fifty of the clients who participated in the first phase of investigation were contacted by

telephone during the period October, 2004 to March 2005, approximately one year after

their case study interview.  Forty-five were successfully interviewed and the second  TP

report was based on follow-up findings relating to their career progression, reflections  TP

on the guidance interview, future plans and next steps.

 

Hughes, D. (2006). Fact or fiction? Transforming careers evidence into action, In Reid, H. & Bimrose, J. (eds). Career Guidance: Constructing the Future. Stourbridge: Institute of Career Guidance, pp. 117-1128.

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. (2006a). UK Country Report for Finnish Presidency Conference (November 2006). Update on Progress in Implementing the May 2004 Council Resolution on Guidance Throughout Life. Commissioned by the Department for Employment and Skills, Sheffield: Moorfoot, pp. 1-19.

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. (2006b). Why evaluate guidance? Via Veiledning, 6. Ministry for Education, Denmark, pp 1-6. Available at:

http://www.ug.dk/Videnscenter%20for%20vejledning/Forside/Virtuelt%20tidsskrift/2006%20nr%206.aspx

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. (2006c). Shaping the Future: Connecting Career Development and Workforce Development: UK Country Paper, Third International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia, pp. 1- 12.

Available at:

http://careers.qut.edu.au/is2006/Country%20Papers%20Received/UK%20Country%20Paper.pdf

Abstract:

In 1999/2000 certain powers, including those covering education and training, were devolved to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, which now have their own administrations ……… These similar, yet differing, arrangements partly reflect the geography, culture, complexity and relative population sizes of the regions; they are also linked to differences in the legal and constitutional responsibilities.

Despite these quasi-federal arrangements, lifelong learning, workforce development and social inclusion are principles that are central to all current UK policy on learning and skills, irrespective of the separate policies emanating from the devolved administrations and the UK parliament.  The targets specified in each separate nation’s skills strategy include those relating to increasing qualification levels, increasing participation in post-compulsory education, and increasing participation in workforce development. The key objectives include supporting individuals to achieve their ambitions through better information, advice and guidance, tackling the obstacles that people face in accessing training and jobs, and encouraging the role that employers and trades unions play in addressing skills and training needs.

 

Hughes, D. (2006d). The future of educational and career guidance: where next? The Julie Hamill Memorial Lecture 2006, Malone House, Belfast, pp. 1- 16. Available at:

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_julie_hamill_memorial_lecture2006.pdf

Abstract:

In this annual lecture it was proposed  that we need to assess and understand more fully changes in patterns of learning, work and lifestyles in order to develop innovative strategies that will make a positive impact on individuals’ abilities to manage their learning and work experiences in the face of constant change. I’d like to share with you a common framework (Blueprint)  currently being piloted separately by the Canadian and Australian governments and invite you to reflect on its potential relevance to Northern Ireland. I present this as a ‘case study’

Hughes, D., Bimrose, J., Brown, A., & Karjalainen, M. (2006). Putting research at the centre of design, development and operation of higher education careers services: A comparative study from the UK and Finland Higher Education. In: Vuorinen, R., & Saukkonen, S. (eds) Guidance Services in Higher Education: strategies, design and implementation. Institute for Educational Research. University of Jyvaskyla, Finland, pp.125-146.

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. & Higginbotham, S. (2006). The future of professional career guidance: where next?  CeGS Occasional Paper. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, pp. 1-10.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_the_future_of_professional_career_guidance_2006.pdf

Abstract:

Career guidance can be viewed as having three key elements: (i) supporting informed choices about both work and learning; (ii) helping individuals to manage transitions more effectively; and (iii) helping people to develop the career management skills to manage their own decisions and transitions throughout their working lives, i.e. to develop resilience in the face of constant change. Resilience is something which the career guidance profession has itself had to be very adept at throughout the past 30 years. The value or ‘currency’ of career guidance is often under-rated, both by policymakers and by others who have not had active experience of it. Managing learning and work is commonly viewed as a relatively straightforward process, or one that can be left to chance; we must now ask ourselves whether this over-simplification represents a fundamental and deep-rooted source of the under-development and under-utilisation of UK talents and skills.

Bimrose, J. & Hughes, D. (2006) IAG Provision and Higher Education. A Paper Prepared for the DfES Review of IAG on behalf of CeGS & NICEC. Summary of Thematic Literature Review for the Consultative Workshop 3rd March 2006. Briefing papers prepared by the research partners, Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_iag_provision_and_he2006.pdf

Abstract:

The higher education landscape in the UK reflects a rich tapestry of information, advice and careers guidance provision, with significant  inconsistencies across services for both young people and adults at the point of entry to Universities, whilst undertaking HE courses and after they leave. A substantial amount of research has already been undertaken into the types of careers interventions that support students and  graduates  progress through higher education into the labour market and further research is underway that will address some of the key relating to IAG and HE.

 

Bimrose, J., Hughes, D., & Collin, A (2006) A critical review of quality assurance mechanisms for Information, Advice and Guidance, Commissioned by the University for Industry (UfI) Sheffield: learndirect. pp. 1 – 48.

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2006/qacr.pdf

Abstract:

The primary purpose of the Skills White Paper (2005) was to address the issue of Britain’s poor productivity by closing the gap between education, training and organisational performance.  Enhancement of information and guidance comprises part of the strategy set out in the White Paper to achieve this………………

At the core of information and guidance services was the current infrastructure, use of which was to be optimised.  learndirect  Advice  (ldA) was identified as a key element of this infrastructure, with an extended role and functions …….

A critical review of arrangements for the quality assurance of information, advice and guidance (IAG) services is presented in this report which embraces a consideration of both the theory and practice of quality assurance.  So far as this has been possible, the key issues of cost and value for money are also considered.

2005

Bimrose, J., Brown, A. & Hughes, D. (2005) ‘Bringing guidance research and practice closer together: the UK National Guidance Research Forum website’, International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, 5 (2), 229 – 240 (0251-2513)

Abstract:

TBA

Bimrose, J., Barnes, S-A. & Hughes, D.(2005) Effective Guidance One Year On: Evidence from Longitudinal Case Studies in England, London/Coventry: Department for Education & Skills/Warwick Institute for Employment Research, [Report to Government]

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2005/egreportoct05.pdf

Abstract:

A qualitative, longitudinal evaluation of effective guidance in England is being conducted by the Warwick Institute for Employment Research over the period 2002 to 2008.  It has been funded by the Department for Education and Skills, Access to Learning Division. This is the second major report from this study

Hughes, D., Bimrose, J. Barnes, S-A., Bowes, L. & Orton, M. (2005)A Systematic Literature Review of Research Into Career Development Interventions for Workforce Development: Final Report. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_a_systematic_literature_review_finalreport2005.pdf

Abstract:

The Department for Education and Skills  (DfES), Engaging Adults in Learning Division, commissioned the Centre for Guidance Studies, (CeGS), University of Derby, and the Institute for Employment Research, (IER), University of Warwick, to undertake a systematic literature review of research evidence on career development initiatives, both within and outside of the workplace.   The primary focus being to concentrate on research findings that specifically relate to initiatives at level 2 or below.   The review identifies research evidence in a systematic and transparent way in order to ascertain what career development interventions (CDIs) motivate employees to engage in learning for work.Other factors that influence the outcomes of workforce development are also explored.

Hughes, D. (2005). Career guidance issues: A practical approach.  Paper presented at Euro-guidance Malta Annual Conference.  Valetta, Malta. December 2005, pp. 1-11.

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. (2005a). A Market in Career? Evidence and Issues – Summary Consultation Report. Sheffield:Department for Education & Skills, pp. 1-3.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/a_market_in_career2005.pdf

Abstract:

This paper, originally prepared for the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) Engaging Adults in Learning Unit, examines the potential application of market principles to the delivery of career guidance in the UK. In particular, it explores the extent to which this could be an effective means of meeting the public interest in expanding provision without making excessive demands on the public purse. The paper includes a review of the international context, a historical review of relevant policy in the UK, and the results of an initial mapping of the current UK market in career guidance provision. The paper was discussed at an invitational consultation event held in March 2005: a summary of the main points from the discussions at this event are included in an annex.

Hughes, D. (2005b). Connexions: Developing Options and Opportunities. CeGS Occasional Paper.  Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, pp. 1-15.  Available at:

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_connexions_developing_options_and_opportunities2005.pdf

Abstract:

The Connexions experiment has reached a crucial stage whereby its future positioning within local

partnership arrangements has yet to be determined. This paper offers stimulus material for policymakers, local authorities, Learning and Skills Councils (LSCs), managers, practitioners, trainers and researchers to give serious consideration to the Connexions service and its future. Three potential models are briefly outlined for consideration within the context of varying and complex youth partnership delivery arrangements throughout England. It is argued that, in the event of dividing responsibility for careers service provision to differing Children’s Trusts, schools and colleges, there is a risk whereby government could find itself highly exposed to failing on its statutory obligation.

Hughes, D (2005c). Peer Review: Supporting lifelong learning through the development of guidance services in Latvia. European Commission – DG Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities, pp. 129-136. Available at

http://pdf.mutual-learning-employment.net/pdf/latvia05/UK.pdf

Abstract:

This paper sets out the relevant UK policy, institutional and economic context; assesses the potential transferability of the host country policy measure to the UK; and notes those issues and developments emerging in the UK that are relevant to the host country policy measure.

Hughes, D. (2005d). Personal perspectives on ‘Youth Matters’ – Industry experts give

their opinions on the Youth Green Paper. Career Guidance Today, 13 (3), pp.12 -15.

Abstract:

TBA

2004

Bimrose, J, Barnes, S.A., Hughes, D. & Orton, M.(2004) ‘What is Effective Guidance? Evidence from Longitudinal Case Studies in England’, Sheffield/Coventry: Department for Education & Skills/Warwick Institute for Employment Research, [Report to Government]

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/publications/2004/egr2004.pdf

Abstract:

This study was funded by the Department for Education and Skills, Access to Learning Division.  Fifty-seven case studies were completed in organisations providing guidance to adults in England during the initial phase of data collection (December, 2002 to March, 2004).  Two of these were pilots and five studies could not be used for various reasons (for example, the interview recorded was not, in the event, guidance).  The fifty clients who participated in this study were followed-up over a four year period (2004-2007) and their progression will be the focus of subsequent reports.

Hughes, D. (2004a). Investing in Career: Prosperity for citizens, windfalls for Government.  Winchester: The Guidance Council, pp. 1 – 24. Available at: http://lifework.ca/UK%20Investing%20in%20Career%2005-04.pdf

Abstract:

This paper represents the output of a journey which began in November 2002 with exposure to a new paradigm and gradually grew into a fresh way of thinking about the impact and benefits of career education, information, advice and guidance. I say ’output’ rather than ‘end’ because I hope it will continue to stimulate thought and discourse and contribute to a better grasp of the scope and scale of the impact of guidance.

Hughes, D. (2004b). Creating evidence: Building the case for career development. The Career Counsellor Journal, Issue No.16, p.2 and p.7.

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D (2004c). Making the case, strong evidence versus “hearsay”.In: Reid, H. & Bimrose, J. eds. Career Guidance: Constructing the Future. Stourbridge:Institute of Career Guidance, pp. 85 – 99.

Abstract:

TBA

Hughes, D. & Gray, S. (2004)A Market in Career Provision? Learning From Experiences on the East Coast of America.CeGS Occasional Paper. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_a_market_in_career_provision2004.pdf

 Abstract:

Developments in technology, creating new possibilities for information dissemination and distance interactions, may have created market opportunities which were previously uneconomic.  It was with this thought in mind that the learndirect advice service asked CeGS to organise a study tour of guidance practice in the largest market economy, the USA.  The USA was interesting for at least three reasons.  The consequences of poor labour market choices in the USA are more profound that than in Europe, creating potential incentives to pay for guidance services.  The scale of the population creates the potential for niche markets to emerge.  And finally, the recent OECD study of guidance policy had omitted the USA, making it to a certain extent unexplored territory.

2003

Hughes, D. (2003b). National Skills Strategy: 14-19 Education: Formal EvidenceHouse of Commons Education and Select Committee: Parliament, London: December 2003, pp.1-5. Available at:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmeduski/37/3702.htm#evidence Written evidence 118.

Abstract:

TBA

Hawkins, P. Howard, M. & Hughes, D. (2003) Succeeding Generations: Inspiring Futures for All.CeGS Occasional Paper, Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_succeeding_generations2003.pdf

Abstract:

In today’s society individual lifestyles and the economy are so variable that it could seem foolish to try to predict accurately the future structure and focus of career guidance services in the UK. However, over the next decade, existing career guidance provision will have to be adapted to meet the ever changing needs of individuals, local communities and the UK/global economy. This paper sets out a vision for career guidance in the future and invites the reader to reflect on the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. As a starting point, try to answer the six key questions.

2002

Bysshe, S. & Hughes, D. (2002) Delivering the ‘Front End’ of the Learning GatewayCeGS Occasional Paper, Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_delivering_the_front_end_of_the_learning_gateway_2002.pdf

Abstract:

The Learning Gateway has been in operation across the country for well over two years. Its rapid introduction in September 1999 was part of a dramatic change in policy, which led to major operational changes within Careers Services, in particular moving resources from pre-16 work to work with disengaged young people aged 16-18. Despite its size and significance, the Learning Gateway has not been subject to ongoing evaluation at a national or regional level. So, how well is the programme working in practice? What delivery models are being used? Do some delivery methods work better than others? How is assessment, guidance and support in the ‘front-end’ contributing tothe achievement of outcomes?  This paper summaries a regional research project undertaken by CeGS for the Government Office East Midlands (GOEM) which aimed to explore these, and other questions, in relation to the operation of the ‘front-end’ of the Learning Gateway in the East Midlands. Copies of the full report are available on the CeGS web-site. Given the issues emerging from the study have significance outside the region, GOEM kindly agreed to sponsor the production of this paper in order to share the East Midlands experience with others, and to inform developing policy and practice.

Bysshe, S. & Hughes, D. (2002) Evaluation of ‘Front End’ of the Learning Gateway in the East Midlands. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_evaluation_of_front_end2002.pdf

Abstract:

The aim of the research was to explore the quality of the ‘front-end’ of the Learning Gateway in the East Midlands. This has involved benchmarking the activities of the four East Midlands Careers Services, and Connexions Lincolnshire and Rutland and an analysis of their systems and procedures for supporting their clients and Personal Advisers (PAs). Feedback was gathered from Managers, PAs, young people and key delivery partners. In addition, the linkages between the ‘front-end’ and the destinations of the Learning Gateway clients were considered through an analysis of Regional and Head Office Management Information System (RHOMIS) data.

Hughes, D., Bosley, S., Bowes, L. & Bysshe, S. (2002) The Economic Benefits of Guidance.CeGS Research Report Series No. 3. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_the_economic_benefits_of_guidance2002.pdf

 Abstract:

This report presents the results of a literature review undertaken by the Centre for Guidance Studies (CeGS) on behalf of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES), Adult Opportunities Unit. It offers an initial assessment of the level of available evidence in relation to the economic benefits of guidance. Due to the limited timescale of the project, it does not represent an entirely comprehensive review; however, it does provide an analysis of relevant historical and contemporary data. Six key recommendations are made to inform policy developments at national, regional and local levels. In the final chapter, over forty research report summaries highlight the main focus of particular studies, key findings and additional comments.

2001

Bosley, S., El-Sawad, A., Hughes, D., Jackson, C., Watts, A.G. (2001) Guidance and Individual Learning Accounts. CeGS Research Report Series No 2. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_guidance_and_individual2001.pdf

Abstract:

This report presents the results of a CeGS/NICEC project on the role of formal and informal guidance in support of Individual Learning Accounts. It draws on five casestudies of good/interesting practice in implementing this role, including learner profiles, and supported by a literature review. It concludes that guidance can play a significant role in engaging non-traditional learners; that it needs to be marketed more effectively; that a strategy is needed for funding for in-depth guidance; and that the use of ILAs themselves as a route for such funding should be encouraged.

Hughes, D., Bowes, L., Hartas, D., and Popham, I (2001) A Little Book of Evaluation. Sheffield: CSNU.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_a_little_book_of_evaluation2001.pdf

Hughes, D., Lang C., Popham I. (2001) Evaluation of the Lincolnshire Connexions Pilot Final Report. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_evaluation_of_the_lincolnshire_connexions2001.pdf

Abstract:

The Lincolnshire Connexions pilot provided an exciting opportunity to test out new  ways of working throughout the county and to develop closer working partnership with a diverse range of youth support organisations. Lincolnshire was one of 13 areas chosen to trail a variety of initiatives to help inform the development of the new Connexions service both nationally and locally. This report was commissioned by the Lincolnshire Connexions pilot to summarise key lessons learned and discuss issues arising from the pilot activities.

Hughes, D. & Morgan, S. (2001) Evaluation of the Coventry and Warwickshire Connexions Service 2000-2001 Final Summary Report. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_evaluation_of_the_covwarwicks_reportno1_2001.pdf

Abstract:

This report was commissioned by the Coventry and Warwickshire  Connexions Strategic Partnership to help identify the overall effectiveness of the local Connexions pilot project. The Coventry and Warwickshire sub-region is one of 16 pilot areas for the new Connexions  service. The pilot is designed to trial new ways of working in local communities and focuses on the work of Personal Advisers (PAs) in educational institutions, and in community settings with partner organisations

 

Hughes, D & Westwood, S (2001) Evaluation of Coventry & Warwickshire Substance Misuse Initiative Employment Support Project. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_evaluation_of_coventrywarwicks_substance_misuse2001.PDF

Abstract:

This report highlights the main achievements of this unique Employment Support  Project (ESP) which is designed to encourage, support and guide drug-misusers into relevant employment, training and/or personal development opportunities. It also provides an overview of success measures, added-value and sustainability issues directly linked to the immediate and future work of the project.

Jackson, C., Watts, A.G., Hughes, D., Bosley, S. & El-Sawad, A. (2001) Careers Service Work with Adults: A Survey.CeGS Occasional Paper. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_careers_service_work_with_adults.pdf

Abstract:

This report presents the findings of a survey of Careers Service Companies about their adult guidance services and services to employers. The extent of such services varies considerably across companies. Between a quarter and a third remain youth-oriented; about a third have expanded their adult guidance provision on a public-service basis; up to a quarter have been entrepreneurial in developing services for individuals and employers on a predominantly fee-paying basis.

Watts, A.G., Hughes, D., Haslam, D. (2001) Working relationships between Careers Services within and outside Higher Education.British Journal of Education and Work, 14(1), 51-70.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_working_relationships2001.pdf

Abstract:

The relationships between Careers Service Organisations and Higher Education Careers Advisory Services have in recent years been made more volatile by competitive pressures induced through quasi-market reforms.  Within a lifelong learning agenda, however, there have been moves towards closer working between the two sets of services.  The extent of current links is reviewed, and their nature is analysed in relation to students pre-entry, on-course and post-exit, in relation to adult guidance, and in relation to activities which crosscut these areas of work – labour-market information, quality standards, and staff development.  The scope for further development of these links is discussed.

2000

Barham, L., Hughes, D., & Morgan S. (2000) New Start: Personal Adviser Pilot Project. Final Report. Commissioned by Government Office for London.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_new_start_personal_adviser2000.pdf

Abstract:

This report examines the experiences of New Start pilot Personal   Advisers working with ‘at risk’ young people aged 16-17 years. It follows from an earlier evaluation study completed in October 1999 and reported in November 1999 (New Start – Paving the way for the Learning Gateway: Personal Adviser pilot projects, DfEE, November 1999, ref: NSREP3).

 

Hughes, D. (2000) Careers Service Work with Young People with Priority Needs: Examples of Practice. London: Department for Education and Employment.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_careers_service_work_with_young_people2000.pdf

Abstract:

The government’s Connexions strategy (2000) requires careers services to work within a new multi-agency framework that places particular emphasis on finding new ways of supporting all young people, particularly those who are ‘at risk’ or in need of extra assistance. In December 1999, the Careers Services National Association(CSNA) Careers Education and Guidance Reference Group, supported by the Department for Education and Employment (DfEE), commissioned a survey to review careers service approaches related to working with disaffected young people.

Hughes, D. & Morgan, S. (2000) Research to Inform the Development of the New Connexions Service. CeGS Occasional Paper. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_research_to_inform2000.pdf

Abstract:

Research can play a crucial role in helping to support policy-makers and practitioners in identifying what works and why, and what types of initiatives are required to help determine appropriate provision and resources. In June 2000, the Department for Education and Employment (DfEE) commissioned the Centre for Guidance Studies to host a national conference at the Post House Forte, Bloomsbury, London. The main purpose of the event was to bring together researchers, academics, practitioners and policy-makers to consider ways in which evidence based practice could be developed and embedded within the new Connexions Service. This paper incorporates the discussion document prepared for the conference, and the event’s conclusions and recommendations.

 

Hughes, D. & Sheldon, R. (2000) Adapt and Prosper.CeGS Occasional Paper. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_adapt_and_prosper2000.pdf

Abstract:

Employee development and work-related learning are key elements within the government’s lifelong learning and workforce development agendas. Guidance has an increasingly important role to play in helping to support both employees and employers, particularly within small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), to adapt and respond to changes in the workplace. This paper provides a review of an ‘agents for change’ approach designed to explicitly respond to the learning and development needs of SMEs. It is suggested that there is much scope to harness the reservoir of guidance skills and knowledge that currently resides nationally within careers service companies. Information, Advice & Guidance for Adults (IAGA) partnerships will also have a crucial role play in developing new guidance strategies to support learners in the workplace.

1999

Watts, A.G., Hughes, D., Haslam, D. (1999) Closer Working? A Review of Working Relationships between Career Service Organisations and Higher Education Careers Advisory Services.CeGS Research Report Series No 1. Derby: Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.

http://www.derby.ac.uk/files/icegs_working_relationships2001.pdf

Abstract:

The relationships between Careers Service Organisations and Higher Education Careers  Advisory Services have in recent years been made more volatile by competitive pressures induced through quasi-market reforms.  Within a lifelong learning agenda, however, there have been moves towards closer working between the two sets of services.  The extent of current links is reviewed, and their nature is analysed in relation to students pre-entry, on-course and post-exit, in relation to adult guidance, and in relation to activities which crosscut these areas of work – labour-market information, quality standards, and staff development.  The scope for further development of these links is discussed.

Evaluation, Research & Development

DMH & Associates Ltd offers high quality services drawing on the international, national and local evidence base for careers work. We work in partnership with a wide range of organisations to find innovative and practical ways of developing effective careers policies, research and practice.
Career Matters Button

Posts of the Past